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Treating Aftertreatment Failure HeadachesHunter Ultrasonics

March 24, 2017 - by James Menzies

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Reducing maintenance costs related to exhaust aftertreatment systems requires fleets to develop their own preventive maintenance (PM) schedules and not rely solely on OEM recommendations.

That’s the advice from Bryan Stewart, director of maintenance with Jones Logistics, who was part of a panel dubbed A Deep Dive Into Emissions Aftertreatment System Maintenance held at the spring meeting of the American Trucking Associations’ Technology & Maintenance Council.  The fleet he oversees consists of 164 tractors out of Columbia, Miss.

“It seemed our trucks were behind a wrecker as much as they were on the highway delivering product,” Stewart lamented.  “We decided we needed to look internally at our PM process. We started defining a checklist and adding new components.  Once we had the checklist in place, we defined processes to ensure the same work out of each technician each and every time.”

Click here or on the image to read the full story in the April Edition of Truck News.

 

A Better Way: Ultrasonic Cleaning

Ultrasonic cleaning of DPFs on a regular, proactive basis is a better way than relying on active regeneration.

In the Ultrasonic cleaning process, the DPF is removed from the vehicle and placed in a patent-pending cleaning system in a custom-designed Ultrasonic tank.  It is then submerged in an environmentally friendly water-based solution which provides a deep, more thorough cleaning.

Hunter Ultrasonics is a world leader in this process.  To find out how Ultrasonic cleaning can reduce DPF maintenance costs, extend engine life and lower fuel costs through improved efficiency, visit www.hunterultrasonics.com, email ken@hunterultrasonics.com or call 416-605-7547.


 

Ultrasonic cleaning is the green way to clean Diesel Particulate FiltersHunter Ultrasonics

Several countries are rolling out standards for reducing diesel engines emissions in order to improve air quality, protect the environment and the health of citizens around the globe.  One requirement gaining popularity is the mandatory equipping of vehicles with Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs).

While the goal of reducing ash, soot and particulate emissions is well intentioned, these filters can become clogged and burning off this buildup puts more pollution back in the air than the filter prevented in the first place.

If governments really want a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, their enforcement standards should be clear on the importance of proactive, preventive DPF cleaning.

 

Proper cleaning of DPF filters

Currently, when DPF filters get clogged, the engine shuts down, rendering it inoperable.

It has to shut down to go through a cleaning process called active regeneration that involves ramping up the engine, dowsing the exhaust system with raw fuel, and bringing the temperature up to nearly 1500 °C for 20-45 minutes in order to burn off the particulates.

This cleaning method defeats the emission reduction benefits of using the filter in the first place.

Active regeneration is inefficient and should not be the preferred method for cleaning DPF filters.  It puts more pollutants into the air, costs more in fuel to complete the burn off and results in lost productivity.

Addressing proper cleaning of DPF filters in future enforcement standards can help the environment and save operators money.

 

Truly a Global issue

Construction is booming in so many regions around the world, as is the reliance on diesel engines.  Nowhere is this more prevalent than in developing nations and urban city centers where vehicles have shorter trips with frequents starts and stops. Filters get clogged more often and active regeneration is increasingly used.

It is an issue that some governments, environmental agencies and equipment operators have recognized.

Several countries including the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom have introduced regulations aimed at reducing diesel engine emissions, but omitting guidelines on proper maintenance and cleaning could result in failing to meet the emission reduction goals.

 

A Better Way: Ultrasonic Cleaning

Ultrasonic cleaning of DPFs on a regular, proactive basis is a better way than relying on active regeneration.

In the Ultrasonic cleaning process, the DPF is removed from the vehicle and placed in a patent-pending cleaning system in a custom-designed Ultrasonic tank.  It is then submerged in an environmentally friendly water-based solution which provides a deep, more thorough cleaning.

Hunter Ultrasonics is a world leader in this process.  To find out how Ultrasonic cleaning can reduce DPF maintenance costs, extend engine life and lower fuel costs through improved efficiency, visit www.hunterultrasonics.com, email ken@hunterultrasonics.com or call 416-605-7547.